Keys To Successful Enrollment Conversations

Keys To Successful Enrollment Conversations

Keys To Successful Enrollment Conversations

A consultant recently asked me, how do I get prospective clients to enroll in the “Enrollment Conversation”  and just be more effective? He told me he often had challenges with keeping the call from going in all kinds of directions and it has become too much of a numbers game with lower conversion rates into paying clients.
One of the most crucial elements in the process of client acquisition for consultants/coaches and professional service providers is the “Enrollment Call”. You may have gotten the scheduled appointment from your lead generation funnels and other sources and they are somewhat interested in learning more. It can be one of the most anxiety generating situations for consultants/coaches because often it can go off the rails and the prospective clients simply state that ‘they will think about it’. Which is usually code for ‘no’. It can be a make or break process for your business affecting the growth and profitability.
So, how do you ensure you have a great shot at converting these prospective clients who agreed to have an enrollment call with you?
There are important elements that are generally universal in successful enrollment calls and necessary in order to have the best possible chance to enroll them as clients. Some of the basics include your state of mind and how you position yourself and before you get on the call. Projecting confidence, certainty and assuredness is the foundational aspect that underpins the success of the enrollment call. If you appear nervous, unsure and not confident at times, it will most certainly affect the prospective client’s view and interpretation of you as an expert who can help them. Think about the times where you have had a discussion with a possible service provider and their effectiveness as communicators and their emotional state how they presented themselves was a huge determining factor of whether you became their client.
I know what you may be thinking just about now. This is not fair, I am very good at what I do and as a professional and expert in my field, that should be enough. Unfortunately,  the psychology indicates otherwise. There have been many studies that have shown that as people we usually evaluate and judge someone in the first 5-8 seconds and their perception of you and how they feel largely determines who they think you are.
Studies have demonstrated that buying decisions are made at an emotional level and justified with the logical arguments and the facts. Both have to be satisfied, on an emotional level, if trust, empathy, connection, rapport, feeling important and some level of likability are not strong, right off the bat we are disqualified and there is little chance they will move forward as paying clients. The logical case also has to be made as well in terms of good fit and you can demonstrate that you can help solve their biggest problem and challenge and your service has the elements that are a high value and will work for them. It’s critical that both be satisfied in the buyer’s mind because on the emotional level it is possible to use this one alone to enroll them into a client, however that’s where buyers remorse and regret of their decision can set in if the logical case for your service is not up to the requirements or not a good fit for them.
Prospective clients are running an internal checklist unconsciously and the common criteria that generally will determine if they become your client includes:
  • Trust capital. Can they trust you?
  • Empathy level, how much you care
  • They feel understood and listened to
  • Good connection and rapport with each other
  • You truly get there one or two biggest challenges and you can solve them
  • Competency, good fit for both sides to do business together
  • Value offer is high and appears to have a high ROI
  • Reliable and structured in your approach
  • They feel excited about the possibilities after using your service
Preparing for your “Enrollment Call” strategically is also key to successful calls. When you go over and prepare with the important elements your level of certainty, confidence and emotional state before the call you will come across much more as influential and as an expert in your field. Remember your first impressions are lasting and you have 5-8 seconds to get off to a good start before the evaluate and judge you as someone who can help them or not.
Literally practice( out loud as well) and have some of the questions and answers you have had in the past ready with the knowledge and the assuredness you can answer any of the questions of the prospective client effectively. You can also do some research on the company or the individual more confident. Tonality and nonverbal are a huge part of effective and persuasive communication levels. Often we focus too much on the words alone and our emotional state and confidence and certainty factor are left by the wayside as an afterthought. It is crucial and a huge determining factor in how you position yourself and come across to the prospective client.
Things To Avoid On An “Enrollment Call”:
  • Being too needy and pushy. This repels and positions you as someone who is not an expert. “Dance Like You Don’t Need The Money”
  • Talking too much, use the 80/20 rule, Listen more than you speak
  • Not asking the right questions to learn on a deeper level what their one or two major challenges are
  • Not asking for the order. Waiting for them to say yes by themselves.
  • Pushing your features and not enough benefits for them
  • Lack of passion and enthusiasm
  • Lack of control of the call. Letting the prospective clients guide you( remain in control by asking them questions)
  • Going way too long on the call. It devalues your time and your credibility and positioning suffers
Get our Free Ebook and learn how to conduct successful enrollment conversations.
[Free Ebook Reveals] 7 Power Steps To Successful Enrollment Conversations
https://goo.gl/U7ytkF

Check Us Out At www.7xmastery.com

All The Best…Talk To You Soon…

Robert Guaiani

Leave a comment

Name
E-mail
Website
Comment